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[untitled]

NETWORK

DURATION
00:30:00

RATING

SCANNED IN
San Francisco, CA, USA

SOURCE
Comcast Cable

TUNER
Channel 89 (615 MHz)

VIDEO CODEC
mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
544

PIXEL HEIGHT
480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Us 2, Colorado 2, Craig 2, Africa 2, Kahita 1, Twyla 1, Cortez 1, Wake Up 1, Red 1, Chijuajua 1, Plateau 1, Mugion Rim 1, Cajon 1, Piggy Bank 1, Purple 1, Africans 1, Peru 1, Colorado Plateau 1, Greenland 1, Mesa 1,
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  SFGTV2    [untitled]  

    November 2, 2012
    4:00 - 4:30am PDT  

4:00am
t, goes down into a mythical underground lake so this is an upside down mountain that leads down into a place called the house of rain. that is where twyla, probably oldest american deity, the rain deity, lives down in the house of rain and this is a t shape from up on the colorado plateau and that is the last picture on these slides, so -- the t shape, the pottery, i followed genetic information that you find in bones and teeth. i followed as many different pieces of information as i could and they sent me walking. i started in chaco canyon and walked north up to mesa verde, around to comb ridge in utah, down into the hopi mesa, across
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the mugion rim, to mexico and then into the sierra madre, following people, following routes. because everything in the desert leaves a route that leads you somewhere. everything out there is a story. and that's what i'm following, these stories, looking for ways, looking for grains of sand out of place, looking for stories out in the middle of nowhere. i can open this up for questions if anybody has any questions. . >> i was wondering if they had any sort of metal or did they use hardened rocks of some sort to shape their stones? . >> most of what they did was stone. metallurgy was just starting to move up into northern chijuajua at that time and they were working with copper.
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that was just ornamental, so there was no metal going on at all other than imported bells. >> and the shells, they went down to cortez -- not lake -- the cortez sea to get, was that mostly hard or brittle? . >> it was hard but not tool hard. the colorado plateau is covered with chert, a glassy rock that is really really good for making tools, making very sharp edges. you find there are pieces of chert all over the place and you can still cut your skin open very quickly with it and it's been sitting out in the open. >> where does chert come from? . >> it's a marine rock that's mostly silica. you find it in these layers, sandstone layers. if you are especially in a marine or water environment, you will find this layer of
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chert. it's in all colors, purple, green, red, blue. it's a beautiful rock. . >> one thing i wanted to ask you, the review in the paper recently on sunday said that your book is different from all the other books about the anastazi because you brought out some of the non-flattering parts of their culture like violence. how did you conclude that they were a violent culture? . >> well, i didn't necessarily conclude they were a violent culture, i just concluded there was violence in their culture. the evidence is very clear where you find masker sites, where every place you drop a trench there are bodies, unburied bodies missing their heads, in some cases where there will be a head in one room and you can match it up to
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the body which is in another room 100 yards away and they didn't just end up there; somebody took the head off. and there will be places where it's all femurs, all gathered together. and places where it's obviously some kind of warfare event where people are all huddled into one spot and they have all been burned there. the record is very clear of some intense violence and it comes up at a very certain point in time. it comes up in the 10th century right before large migrations you see this layer of violence. and it doesn't cover everything. sometimes a series of pueblos will all be destroyed over here and then a series of pueblos over here are in perfect condition as far as the walls aren't broken down, there aren't bodies all over the place. it looks like the place was left very peacefully or
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ceremoniously where you can see they left artifacts out. different people had different ends but you can see where different people had unfortunate ends. i don't want to get into the details, it's in the book, but fairly grisly evidence. there are pockets of violence. these were human beings. some of the anastazi were beautiful, wise, balanced with the earth people and it's like, no, they were us, doing their neolithic stone age thing but still us, human beings living in a place, chopping each other into little pieces sometimes and living lives of prosperity at other times. >> we have time for one more
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question. >> was the global warming when they were (inaudible) greenland and a cathedral there and i believe the maya moved from the lowlands to the highlands and the anastazi came down to the salt river. >> yeah, a lot of the movement was based on climate. the anastazi were always moving. the whole thing about the disappearing anastazi, you go to where they are living and they disappear all of a sudden. but you follow them and find, oh, 10 years later they are over here and 70 years later they are over here. they are often being driven by these climate changes which on the colorado plateau, very small changes make you go. if you lose one inch of precipitation in one year, you got to get up to the mesas where there's a little more
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rain and then when the frost comes in too early, you got to get down to the desert. around 1276 or so the water was running out, the seasons were no good, and i think they just looked at their trade routes and said let's follow these and go south. they were always getting pushed around by the environment. . >> okay, thank you, craig, so much. thank you for coming. craig is happy to take some more informal questions in back and of course his book, house of rain, is available for sale in back too. thank you so much and thank you, craig childs. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
4:08am
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * >> good evening i am the director of the culture association and devoted to the program and here we have master of arts. (applause).
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(speaking spanish) (speaking spanish). >> what he is saying that thanks to the bant.
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bante he got funding for of the peru vaifian culture and got approved. >> (speaking spanish). >> okay. >> good. (speaking spanish). >> so we have a variety of instruments -- that we're going to be showing you. >> (speaking spanish). >> the name of the instrument is called tale boheha. >> (speaking spanish).
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>> it was a time in peru when the africans were prohibited from playing or making instruments. >> (speaking spanish). >> so they were forced to make their own instruments. >> (speaking spanish). >> so they use the surroundings and big jars and they used to have water or other type was drinks. >> (speaking spanish). >> covered with leather skin. >> (speaking spanish).
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>> and they make the drums. >>. >> (speaking spanish). (drums). (applause). >> (speaking spanish). >> this instrument is called
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dungo. >> spr (speaking spanish). >> we have two but only one was used. >> (speaking spanish). >> this is one that was used north of the capital. >> (speaking spanish). >> in the cities of the country >> (speaking spanish).
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>> when he was a child he was able to see those instruments and on extension today. (drums). (applause)
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. >> this is a donkey's jaw. it could be a horse or a donkey. >> donkey's jaw. >> and it's played by spiking it
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and to make the rattle sound and also creates this. (applause). >> (speaking spanish) sorry.
4:17am
(speaking spanish). >> this is the kahita and it is created as the -- i don't know that word. how do you say that? the piggy bank. you know where the boxes and the churches collect money? yeah. this is the original he here. yeah. >> (speaking spanish) (laughing)
4:18am
(speaking spanish). >> this instrument is called c carete and with the right hand and the left hand and open and
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shuts in a rhythmic time. >> (speaking spanish). >> so this instrument is called sen sero but it's actually a cow bell. >> (moo). >> it was made out of material. >> (speaking spanish).
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>> but for the african and any instrument that create a rhythm or a sound will become an instrument. (speaking spanish) (applause). >> (speaking spanish).
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>> these are the spanish influences. >> (speaking spanish). >> they adapted to the style of this type of music
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(applause). >> (speaking spanish). >> these are just simple spoons, kitchen spoons. (applause). >> (speaking spanish).
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>> and here we have our principle instrument. >> (speaking spanish). >> the name of this instrument is called cajon. >> (speaking spanish). >> in certain places in africa this instrumentality existed. >> (speaking spanish). >> and the percussionist will play with their hands and their feet. >> (speaking spanish). >> with the african slave trade
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he used to be in the ports. this type of boxes. >> (speaking spanish). >> so they were sit over these big boxes and play over them. >> (speaking spanish). >> but for the blacks these type of instruments were not allowed
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to be played because they were too loud and for the church they will provoke movement that was not appropriate. >> (speaking spanish). >> they could also work as a form of communication with the drumming patterns. >> (speaking spanish). >> this was what was going on in africa. >> (speaking spanish). >> and from some of the sounds they used to play that we almost lost all of them we still have some that he remembers. >> (speaking spanish). >> for instance --
4:26am
>> (speaking spanish). >> this means "attention be alert. something is going to happen". >> (speaking spanish). >> wake up. wake up. >> wake up, wake up. (speaking spanish). >> and this are some of the drumming patterns that have been rescued by the cultural association. >> (speaking spanish).
4:27am
>> the african and review itse s size. >> (speaking spanish). >> to the actual size that he has. >> (speaking spanish). >> the reason why this drum was reduced in its size it was the intention of hiding it from the dominant class so they will not be oppressed by playing it.
4:28am
>> (speaking spanish) (drums)
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